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MTP/IP

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MTP/IP
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FAQ

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

0 General
0.1 What is MTP/IP?
0.2 How is it used?
0.3 Who can use MTP?
0.4 Who benefits from MTP and how?
0.5 Does it really work?
0.6 I've heard others make such claims before.  Why should I believe you?
0.7 How can I learn more?
1 Technology
1.0 Is MTP/IP compatible with existing networks?
1.1 Where does MTP fit in with other acronyms like HTTP, PPP, TCP, etc?
1.2 How much faster is MTP compared to TCP?
1.3 Why is MTP faster than TCP?
1.4 Other technology vendors claim 100x faster or more, why don't you?
1.5 XYZ Corp has a UDP technology they say is really fast.  Why is MTP better?
1.6 Is MTP a compression scheme?
1.7 Is MTP a custom TCP implementation?
1.8 Don't all your gains come at the expense of third-party traffic?
1.9 Is MTP always faster than TCP?
1.10 Is MTP ever slower than TCP?
1.11 How scalable is MTP?
1.12 Is MTP a reliable protocol?
1.13 Is MTP meant to replace TCP?
2 Deployment
2.1 What is needed to use MTP?
2.2 Does the end user need to install anything (kernel drivers, DLLs, applications, etc.)?
2.3 Does MTP require changes or upgrades to the operating system?
2.4 Does MTP require special hardware?
2.5 Does MTP work with firewalls, NAT, DHCP, PPPoE, etc?
2.6 Does MTP require that a specific UDP port number be used?
2.7 Is MTP compatible with proxies?
2.8 Does MTP need to be adopted as a standard before it can be used?
2.9 Does MTP need to be present at both ends?
2.10 Can I try it?
3 Security
3.1 Is MTP more secure than TCP?
3.2 Does MTP support encryption?
3.3 Does MTP work with encrypted VPNs and IPsec?
3.4 Is MTP vulnerable to any of the Denial of Service attacks used against TCP?
3.5 Is it possible for a Denial of Service attack to be designed against MTP?
3.6 Does MTP have any vulnerabilities similar to the TCP session termination issue?

0 General

0.1 What is MTP/IP?
MTP/IP, or Multipurpose Transaction Protocol® technology, is network transport software that moves data much more quickly and efficiently than traditional TCP/IP technology.
0.2 How is it used?
MTP/IP is built in to end-user software such as the ExpeDat file transfer application, and the SyncDat directory replication application.  Because it is software built on top of existing network standards, it can be installed and running in seconds.  These applications are also designed for easy embedding within other systems.  Software Development Kits are also available, allowing application developers to greatly improve the speed, efficiency, and features of their own products.
0.3 Who uses MTP/IP?
Anyone who is experiencing less than optimal transfer speed on their existing data networks can benefit from MTP/IP software.  Our customers range from small businesses to Fortune 100 enterprises.  See our Solutions pages for more examples.
0.4 Who benefits from MTP/IP and how?
End-users benefit from faster speeds, new functionality, and better reliability, and up to 85% savings on infrastructure costs.  Application developers and integrators benefit by improving their product's performance and features, meeting the growing demand for network efficiency.
0.5 Does it really work?
Yes.  MTP/IP is a robust technology being used by some of the biggest enterprises in the world.  You can find out for yourself with any of our free trial downloads.
0.6 I've heard others make such claims before.  Why should I believe you?
Several companies market technologies to improve network performance, each with significant limitations:
  • Compression, which has a lot of overhead, can compromise data quality, and only works if the data isn't already compressed or encoded;
  • Caching, which requires a high degree of data repetition and does nothing for unique or dynamic data flows;
  • Prioritization, which sacrifices the performance of some data for the benefit of other data;
  • TCP tuning, which sacrifices adaptability to improve performance in a particular stable environment; and
  • UDP streamers, which send data packets at a fixed rate and, at best, react to flooding after the fact.
MTP/IP is none of these: it is a unique, patented, completely original transport protocol designed to adapt to any network path for maximum efficiency with minimum disruption.
0.7 How can I learn more?
Read the rest of the FAQ and our website, call us at +1 617-500-0002, or send a message to info@DataExpedition.com

1 Technology

1.0 Is MTP/IP compatible with existing networks?
Yes!  MTP/IP is built on top of the existing UDP/IP standard, which is supported by all hardware and operating systems that are compliant with Internet standards.  MTP adds sophisticated flow-control, error-recovery, and session management layers on top of UDP/IP.  This allows it to provide new performance and efficiency in software that works with existing systems.
1.1 Where does MTP/IP fit in with other acronyms like HTTP, PPP, TCP, etc?
The Internet is often organized into four protocol layers: application, transport, network, and link.  This is called the Protocol Stack (similar to the 7 layer OSI stack).
  • The application layer refers to protocols that manage data content and are not concerned with the details of how the data gets moved.  Examples are web (HTTP), email (SMTP), file transfer (FTP), and news groups (NNTP).
  • The actual data movement is usually left up to the transport layer, traditionally the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP/IP).  The transport layer handles error correction and flow control, but leaves the routing of data across the network to the underlying network layer.
  • The Internet is pretty much defined by the use of the Internet Protocol (IP) at the network layer to route data across the many links, or hops, which may lie between machines.
  • The protocols used to physically communicate data across those links (ethernet, FDDI, PPP, v.90 etc) make up the link layer.  Most of these are related to physical hardware and many can be layered on top of each-other.
MTP is a transport protocol, so it sits between applications and the network, providing fast and reliable delivery of data.
1.2 How much faster is MTP compared to TCP?
1.3 Why is MTP faster than TCP?
TCP's design is over thirty-years old and it makes a lot of assumptions about the network that are now just plain wrong.  As a result, TCP wastes a lot of time and bandwidth causing congestion that it must then correct.  MTP is much more careful and is able to fully utilize the resources that TCP wastes.
1.4 Other technology vendors claim 100x faster or more, why don't you?
Anybody can "dial-a-result" to claim 100x or 500x faster using lab-tests, emulators, or crippled TCP stacks.  We believe in real-world results, which is why we are the only vendor to make our full software packages available to everyone for immediate download.
1.5 XYZ Corp has a UDP technology they say is really fast.  Why is MTP better?
Most such protocols simply dump data into the network as fast as possible and hope that some of it will get through.  Whatever doesn't get through, they try to send again later.  Flooding the network like this causes massive congestion and packet-loss.  Ultimately, such protocols spend almost as much time correcting for lost data as they save by flooding.  They also severely degrade third-party traffic in the process.  While MTP also happens to be built on top of UDP/IP, MTP performs very careful flow control and error recovery.  MTP does not flood the network, actually causes less congestion than TCP, and because of its greater efficiency is able to reliably move data faster than flooding and streaming mechanisms.
1.6 Is MTP a compression scheme?
No.  Some MTP applications, such as ExpeDat, provide inline compression as an additional benefit, but MTP itself does not rely on reducing the size of the data: it actually sends the data faster.
1.7 Is MTP a custom TCP implementation?
No.  The MTP technology is completely unrelated to TCP.
1.8 Don't all your gains come at the expense of other traffic?
No.  While any new network traffic may impact existing traffic, kilobyte for kilobyte MTP has less of an effect on ambient TCP data flow than TCP itself.  Much of MTP's performance gain comes from its better utilization of otherwise wasted resources. MTP even has bandwidth management features built-in, giving you the option to precisely control how resources are allocated.
1.9 Is MTP always faster than TCP?
No.  MTP can't move data faster than the underlying hardware.  If you have a slow connection, a very short network path, and there is no congestion, then TCP might be able to "fill the pipe".  See our Analyzing Network Performance technical note for tips on testing your network's capabilities.  Or just download a free trial right-now and see for yourself whether MTP/IP can benefit you.
1.10 Is MTP ever slower than TCP?
No, all else being equal MTP will move data across a network least as fast as TCP.  However, you can configure MTP applications to regulate resource use, instructing it to go slower if you so choose.  Other components in the network path can also choose to slow some traffic more than others.  See our Common Network Problems technical note for tips on optimizing your data network.
1.11 How scalable is MTP?
It is being used on link speeds from 28.8 kilobits per second to 10 gigabits per second, at latencies from below 1 millisecond to as high as 20,000 milliseconds, and at packet loss rates from 0% to 50%.
1.12 Is MTP a reliable protocol?
Yes, MTP guarantees delivery of data.  See Tech Note 0028 for details.
1.13 Is MTP meant to replace TCP?
For the vast majority of applications and network conditions, MTP provides superior performance to TCP.  There are only a few applications in which TCP has any advantage (for example, character-by-character interactive applications such as telnet).  However, MTP and TCP can peacefully co-exist in the same network and even in the same application.  An application can easily support both, automatically using MTP when communicating with a system that supports MTP, and otherwise falling back on TCP.

2 Deployment

2.1 What is needed to use MTP?
Simply download and install MTP software.  See Tech Note 0004 for operating system requirements and Tech Note 0023 for hardware recommendations.
2.2 Does the end user need to install anything else (kernel drivers, DLLs, applications, etc.)?
No.  MTP applications are self-contained executables, most less than one megabyte in size.  Client applications do not require administrative privileges.
2.3 Does MTP require changes or upgrades to the operating system?
No.  See Tech Note 0004 for a list of currently supported operating systems.
2.4 Does MTP require special hardware?
No.  See Tech Note 0023 for hardware recommendations.
2.5 Does MTP work with firewalls, NAT, DHCP, PPPoE, etc?
Yes.  See Tech Note 0002 for firewall configuration tips.
2.6 Does MTP require that a specific UDP port number be used?
No.  You are free to choose whatever port number is most convenient for your application or end-user environment.
2.7 Is MTP compatible with proxies?
Yes.  Proxy servers only deal with TCP traffic for specific application types and will ignore UDP based traffic, such as MTP.
2.8 Does MTP need to be adopted as a standard before it can be used?
No.  MTP is already built on top of existing Internet standards.
2.9 Does MTP need to be present at both ends?
Yes, since MTP is a communications protocol, it must be present at both ends of a path in order to accelerate that path.
2.10 Can I try it?
Yes!  See our products page for links to application trials.  For a trial of our Software Development Kits, please contact us.

3 Security

3.1 Is MTP more secure than TCP?
Yes.  MTP is at least as secure as TCP in all respects and is less vulnerable to several types of attacks.  See Tech Note 0016 for details.
3.2 Does MTP support encryption?
Yes.  All of DEI's applications support AES encryption.  The SDKs support the use of any encryption mechanism.
3.3 Does MTP work with encrypted VPNs and IPsec?
Yes.  MTP will operate over any VPN which supports UDP/IP.  Note that SSL and other tunneling VPNs do not fully support UDP/IP.  IPsec VPNs are recommended for maximum performance and security.
3.4 Is MTP vulnerable to any of the Denial of Service attacks used against TCP?
No.  Due to its completely different architecture, attacks against TCP will not directly affect MTP.
3.5 Is it possible for a Denial of Service attack to be designed against MTP?
Yes.  It is not possible to completely eliminate the threat of DoS attacks when operating on a public network.  However MTP's low-overhead design and more secure packet validation does minimize the potential impact of such attacks.  MTP also provides application developers with better tools for identifying and squelching suspicious activity.
3.6 Does MTP have any vulnerabilities similar to the TCP session termination issue?
No.  Unlike TCP, MTP datagrams carry information specifically designed to verify that each arriving datagram belongs to a valid transaction.