Tech Note 0033

Diagnostic Logging

How to enabling diagnostic logging

MTP/IP continuously monitors network conditions.  The resulting statistics can reveal problems in the network infrastructure.  If you are experiencing performance or connectivity issues, follow the steps below to record MTP/IP's diagnostic output and send it to DEI for analysis.

Network monitoring only occurs at the receiving side of a data transfer.

Network conditions are monitored at the client only when downloading data.  Network conditions are monitored at the server only when uploading data.  Make sure you have enabled diagnostics at the point where data is being received.

Once you have enabled diagnostic logging as described below, perform at least two data transfers each lasting at least 30 seconds.  Then zip and email the resulting log file to DEI.

Unless otherwise instructed, each test should consist of a single large file using default settings and directly attached storage.  Do not transfer a folder, target network attached storage, or use non-default settings for your initial tests.  Additional testing can be performed later, once a baseline has been established.

ExpeDat Desktop

The following steps will enable diagnostic logging for the ExpeDat Desktop client and save the logs in a file named ExpeDat_Desktop.log at a location of your choosing.

Desktop Logging
  1. Launch ExpeDat Desktop.
  2. Click the "Opt" button in the middle of the main window.
  3. Select the "Setup" pane of the "Options" or "About" window.
  4. In the "Debug Level" field, enter "1".
  5. Next to the "Log File" field, click "Browse".
  6. Select a location to save the "ExpeDat_Desktop.log" file.
  7. Click "Save" in the browse dialog.
  8. Click "Save" in the "Options" or "About" window.
  9. Quit ExpeDat Desktop
  10. Restart ExpeDat Desktop
  11. Perform the download tests as instructed.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the ExpeDat_Desktop.log file.  The file is plain text and can be read in any text editor.  Zip the file and email it to DEI.

movedat

The following steps will modify a movedat command to enable logging and save the logs in a file named "movedat.log" at a location of your choosing.

  1. Type, but do not start, the movedat command you would normally use to download a file.
  2. Immediately after the "movedat" command itself and before other options, add " -d 1 -s -y ".
  3. At the end of the command, add " >> movedat.log".
  4. For example:
    movedat -d 1 -s -y user@example.com:source_file destination >> movedat.log
  5. Press return and allow the command to finish.  There may be no output displayed.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the movedat.log file.  The file is plain text and can be read in any text editor.  Zip the file and email it to DEI.

syncdat

The following steps will modify a syncdat command to enable logging and save the logs in a file named "syncdat.log" at a location of your choosing.

  1. Type, but do not start, the syncdat command you would normally use to download a file.
  2. Immediately after the "syncdat" command itself and before other options, add " -d 1 ".
  3. At the end of the command, add " 2>> syncdat.log" for the bash shell or " >>& syncdat.log" for csh.
  4. For example:
    syncdat -d 1 -r localfolder user@example.com:source_folder >> syncdat.log
  5. Press return and allow the command to finish.  There may be no output displayed.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the syncdat.log file.  The file is plain text and can be read in any text editor.  Zip the file and email it to DEI.

servedat Command

The following steps will modify a servedat QuickStart command to enable logging and save the logs in a file named "servedat.log" at a location of your choosing.  This assumes you are running servedat in QuickStart mode from the command line.

  1. Type, but do not start, the servedat command you would normally use to start the server on the command line.
  2. Immediately after the "servedat" command itself and before other options, add " -d 1 -l servedat.log ".
  3. For example:
    servedat -d 1 -l C:\servedat.log C:\ExpeDat_Files
  4. Press return to start the server.
  5. Have a client perform an upload to the server.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the servedat.log file.  The file is plain text and can be read in any text editor.  Zip the file and email it to DEI.

servedat Installed

The following steps will modify the configuration file of an installed servedat.  This assumes that you have installed servedat as a system service and that logs are already being recorded in the standard location

  1. Edit servedat.cf.  On Windows systems, this will be at "C:\Windows\servedat.cf".  On all other systems, it will be at "/etc/servedat.cf".  You will need administrative privileges to edit this file.
  2. At the bottom of the file, add the line "Debug 1".
  3. Save "servedat.cf".
  4. Restart servedat.  On Windows, locate the "Services" administrative tool, right click on the "ServeDat" service, and select "Restart".  On most other systems, type "sudo killall -HUP servedat".
  5. Have a client perform an upload to the server.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the servedat.log file.  The file is plain text and can be read in any text editor.  Zip the file and email it to DEI.

Other Commands

The following steps will modify other MTP/IP application commands, such as syncdat or tclient, to enable logging and save the logs in a file named "mtp.log" at a location of your choosing.  See the documentation for the particular application for more details.

  1. Type, but do not start, the command you would normally use.
  2. Immediately after the command itself and before other options, add " -d 1 ".
  3. At the end of the command, add " >> mtp.log".
  4. Press return and allow the command to finish.  There may be no output displayed.

Diagnostic logs will be recorded in the mtp.log file.  Depending on the application, some output may be displayed as well.  Copy any output into another text file and save it.  Zip both the log file and the display output file, and email them to DEI.

Tech Note History

Nov072017syncdat for bash and csh
Feb232017ExpeDat Desktop
Jan232015First Post